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Eternal Considerations

Modernity calls for tolerance. We avoid offending others and hide our true feelings under euphemisms, silence, or reluctant compliance. Evangelists shy away from convicting people of sin and instead preach only about God’s love.

God is love, but God is also just. If we do not realize our sin, we will not understand our need for salvation. Yet by realizing our inherent depravity, God’s love becomes all the greater because now we know how little we deserve the salvation God has given us.

In this next selection from “Learning in Wartime,” C.S. Lewis emphasizes the importance of doctrinal clarity, especially regarding salvation.

Now it seems to me that we shall not be able to answer these questions until we have put them by the side of certain other questions which every Christian ought to have asked himself in peace-time. I spoke just now of fiddling while Rome burns. But to a Christian the true tragedy of Nero must be not that he fiddles while the city was on fire but that he fiddles on the brink of hell. You must forgive me for the crude monosyllable. I know that many wiser and better Christians than I in these days do not like to mention heaven and hell even in a pulpit. I know, too, that nearly all the references to this subject in the New Testament come from a single source. But then that source is Our Lord Himself. People will tell you it is St. Paul, but that is untrue. These overwhelming doctrines are dominical. They are not really removable from the teaching of Christ or of His Church. If we do not believe them, our presence in this church is great tomfoolery. If we do, we must sometime overcome our spiritual prudery and mention them.

The moment we do so we can see that every Christian who comes to a university must at all times face a question compared with which the questions raised by the war are relatively unimportant. He must ask himself how it is right, or even psychologically possible,for creatures who are every moment advancing either to heaven or to hell, to spend any fraction of the little time allowed them in this world on such comparative trivialities as literature or art, mathematics or biology. If human culture can stand up to that, it can stand up to anything. To admit that we can retain our interest in learning under the shadow of these eternal issues, but not under the shadow of a European war, would be to admit that our ears are closed to the voice of reason and very wide open to the voice of our nerves and our mass emotions.

Eternity, education, or ethics: What is most important in life?

 

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